Shopping Centers Today

DEC 2016

Shopping Centers Today is the news magazine of the International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC)

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70 S C T / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 6 brand's many flavors: "Champagne, Bitter, Ghana Bitter, Mild Cacao, Au Lait, Maccha and White — the fine, delicate combination of selected chocolate and fresh cream with a hint of prestige liqueurs makes this signature collection very special." The company makes other types of chocolate products, including potato chip chocolates. "These are potato chips coated with chocolate on one side only for a perfect combination of sweetness and saltiness," Romaniszyn said. And even here, choice is rich: "Original, Mild Bitter, Fromage Blanc and Caramel." n For more information, visit Royceconfectusa.com. These chocolates have a shelf life of about one month, according to the company Mall of America's permanent take on the pop-up phenomenon is a new, 2,500-square- foot store called Debut. The store, which opened in November, is a collection of rotating shop-in-shops, each with a distinct design, theme and selection of merchandise. "Mall of America continually Permanent pop - up works to curate a unique and seamless customer experience," said says Liz McLay, senior vice president of leasing at the mall. "Debut gives us the opportunity to showcase new retail brands, many that are consistently requested from our guests. The space will feature a dynamic rotation of pop up shops and conveniently allow guests to shop a variety of merchandise within a cohesive shopping experience." The first nine brands to be featured in the shop are West Elm Local, Woolrich, men's apparel retailer Askov Finlayson, jewelry label Laurel Way by Pam Mondale, leather and canvas goods maker BillyKirk, sportswear brand Todd Snyder Plus Champion, book and gift seller Pomegranate, wool apparel brand Shepherd of Sweden and outdoor apparel brand Fisher and Baker. Royce goes to great lengths to make sure that its factory abides by strict production and hygiene standards. Employees pass through an air tunnel to remove dust from their factory- issued uniforms and shoes before they begin work, for instance. And the factory's ventilation pipes are covered with fine-mesh filters to ensure a constant intake of fresh, dust-free air. Even the customer has a part to play in maintaining product quality: These chocolates have a shelf life of about one month, according to the company, which recommends that they be kept refrigerated at below 50 degrees Fahrenheit. Romaniszyn gleefully rattles off some of the S T O R E F R O N T S

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